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Our Mission & Partners

We're on a mission to save the bees. 

Honey Bee Conservation and Research

We proudly partner with UC Davis, the world's #1 agricultural school, to spread awareness of the species and support local beekeepers. Proceeds of each purchase will be donated to UC Davis and will contribute to university bee research, creation of new hives, repopulation of bees, education of communities, long term solutions to the declining population of bees and more!

Promoting Bee Research

The Honey & Pollination Center at UC Davis works with UC Davis departmental partners to promote research in the fields of pollination, bee health and honey quality and bring that information to our stakeholders and the public. The center is involved in efforts to build awareness of the importance of our native pollinators and honey bees.

Bee Crest is honored to contribute to UC Davis' mission to promote agricultural, environmental, and social sustainability to meet the challenges global change through research, teaching, and public engagement.

Why We Do It

Bee Crest consists of savvy bee lovers who just like you are terrified and outraged by the fact that honey bees are slowly going extinct. Bees pollinate 1/3 of all crops; their population decline is undeniably one of the pressing issues of our time. We are committed to making an impact by spreading awareness and supporting local beekeepers.

Know where your money goes

Your contribution will not go unnoticed! Bee Crest is represented in and supplies many bee-saving activities all around the nation!

UC Davis's Current Research

Current research includes, honey bee genetics and breeding, native bee biology and queen bee reproductive health. Queen bees are crucial to the survivorship and productivity of the entire colony as queen bees are the only bee capable of reproducing. The expert faculty at UC Davis continues to develop research providing long term solutions to the decline of honey bee population by studying the health and reproductive health processes of queen bees.